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Radio Moscow PRESS

What’s most impressive about this Midwestern psyche-blues heavyweight contender is that not only will fuzz-brained Blue Cheer and Cream fans get their psyches freaked out by these interstellar psyche freakouts, but fans of art jazz “important” music can definitely dig on these rolling, rambling, noisy, powerful “important” sounds. This mind-expansion magic is H-U-G-E! – Roctober Magazine
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Sounding like Cream on a heady mixture of acid and amphetamines, Radio Moscow will detonate your mind with one listen to their third album “The Great Escape of Leslie Magnafuzz”. Just listen to “Little Eyes” the intense and crazy opener that mixes Blue Cheer with Acid Mother Temple, offering the whole thing to the Gods of fucked-up noise (…) Over twelve tracks, this album is a relentless steam train of guitar riffing, dirty solos and power chords, held together by rock solid rhythms and crying out to be turned right up, the energy levels never faltering and the interest held until the very end, as “Inside Out” finally shreds the last of your grey matter from the insides of your skull. The perfect match of sixties excess and stoner riffing. – Terrascope Rumbles
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Nothing succeeds like excess and Radio Moscow deserve a shedload of it. Success, that is. An old-style power trio with an overload of psychedelic headspace, they’re structured around guitarist Parker Griggs whose exemplary six-string work carves sonic holes. They play songs that are only occasionally lengthy (most clock in at 4mins) but the tightly-coiled intensity’s the thing. – i94 Bar
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Trends come and go, but the idea of a bunch of guys getting together in a garage and playing the kind of music that makes the neighbors call the cops — that’s forever. And it’s that idea that’s crystallized in the form of Radio Moscow, more so than any other local product.
There’s no hipster lo-fi. No digital manipulation to muddle the sound or Slipknot-style gimmicks to distract from it. Radio Moscow is rock music as the gods intended: recorded straight to tape and full of dirty amps, manic drums; syrup-thick bass lines and some of the best modern-day guitar hooks this side of Buckethead.
Parker Griggs – the magician responsible for those licks and pride of Story City – is not just a cheap homage to dervishes like Hendrix and Jeff Beck. Rather, he’s a direct descendant, cobbled together from whatever pieces of cosmic cloth were left over from their creation and handed a guitar. – Chad Taylor / Ames Tribune
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The Great Escape of Leslie Magnafuzz firmly feeds from the teat of late sixties and seventies Nuggets comp forefathers, vocal effects and hallucinogens dripping from the speakers. – Blurt
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If you remember Grand Funk and Blue Cheer with any degree of affection (and you should) this is what they sound like crash-landing in the twenty-first century. – Leicester Bangs
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Apart from being almost shocked that a modern band are not only playing and writing this type of music but doing so extremely well, there is also the revelation which is Parker Griggs to take in. – Pennyblack Music
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It would seem that rather than being the central character of a grand concept album, the Leslie Magnafuzz of the title is more likely an amalgamated nod to the band’s love of revolving speaker cabinets and vintage effects pedals, with the Great Escape part perhaps referencing Griggs’ recent incarceration for possession of marijuana. – Subba-Cultcha
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One can only dream that Radio Moscow could be sent back in time to tread the stage of Winterland on a bill with Hendrix, Sabbath, Crimson, Ten Years After or Humble Pie. The album opens in full hypersonic stride, with the bass and drums threatening to run away from the ear-clearing wails of Parker’s fuzzed guitar, and the bombast doesn’t let up until disc’s end. – Hyperbolium
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Reproducing the sound and the atmosphere of an early 70s, pot-addled psych rock jam band is a hell of a lot harder than it first appears, but creative dynamo Parker Griggs – who plays everything here apart from the bass guitar – is clearly some kind of wicked genius, because songs like Little Eyes, Speed Freak and the wonderfully skewed Insideout sound like they have been spoon-fed tie-dyed hash fudge and then beamed forward in time, perfectly formed and thoroughly convincing. – Dom Lawson / Metal Hammer UK
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Those who love heavy guitar psych workouts will kill for this album. – Albums You Just Gotta Hear
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If you like psychedelic blues rock, you must hear this record! – Scott’s Music Reviews
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If you’re looking for some well-executed heavy psych with wild guitar then look no further. – Shindig!
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The Great Escape Of Leslie Magnafuzz shows that the US trio have perfected their ‘psychedelic blues meet stoner rock’ style. – Total Guitar UK
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Gonzai review of The Great Escape Of Leslie Magnafuzz (France)
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Radio Moscow (Parker Griggs) – photo by Robert Matheu

Where is Parker Griggs? The 27-year-old lead singer of psychedelic blues band Radio Moscow may as well be off the grid entirely.
Griggs created Radio Moscow in his hometown of Story City, though it was relocated to Colorado, then back to Iowa, and now to a secluded cabin in an unincorporated area of northern California.
“It’s a strange mix of folks out here,” Griggs said. “It’s quite different.”
It’s the kind of seclusion that hardly exists in the 21st century: no Internet access, spotty phone reception and few neighbors. But it is an ideal practice space and home for a band looking for the freedom to play music on its own terms and disappear for a few months to create a new album. – Erin Randolph / Des Moines Register
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Radio Moscow’s frontman and founder Parker Griggs doesn’t just play stoner rock; he is stoner rock.

The proof is in his wafer-thin frame and long hair, his pot-inspired album artwork, his imprisonment for possession of hash and his unapologetic devotion to classic psychedelic rock and proto-metal blues inspired by Blue Cheer, Jimi Hendrix, Deep Purple and Cream. It is so ingrained in every fiber of his being that one could argue that he arrived on the scene 40 years too late.

Yet before anyone accuses Griggs of being the musical equivalent of an acid flashback, consider the modest success Radio Moscow has earned in its short life during a time when boring, predictable, corporate-backed musicians rule the roost. To be sure, the “new is old philosophy” that applies to retrogressive predecessors like The White Stripes, The Black Keys, Amy Winehouse and Raphael Saadiq applies to Parker.

“When we started, there wasn’t anything like us going on,” said Parker, 27, from his California home. – Complete City View piece here
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This album is a little more psychedelic than previous albums, but when is that ever a bad thing? – The Soda Shop
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Most of the album actually feels like the LSD-induced blur which typifies the era it is trying to emulate. Guitar riffs blur into one another, vocals are definitely interchangeable, and you find yourself at the end of the 12 songs wondering what to do with yourself. – The Edge
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California based band lovingly concoct a Cream/Hendrix inspired album of cosmic blues. – Evening Telegraph UK
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Reviving the spirit of reverb pioneers Jimi Hendrix and Cream, The Great Escape… seamlessly interweaves classic rock and blues that experiments with both vocal and sound distortion. Griggs, Zach Anderson (bass), and Cory Berry (drums) carry their predecessor’s torch into 2011 with songs that simultaneously make your heart swoon while melting your face off. Near the end you’ll reach the track "Deep Down Below," which best exhibits the true mojo of this power trio’s music. – The Waster
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With a powerful, crunching Sabbath-style chords and fiery solos that earn the right to be called Hendrixian, Iowa power trio Radio Moscow plants its flag firmly in the territory where psychedelic rock, cranked-up blues, and metal meet. The sound is unabashedly retro (specifically, FM radio from around 1973), so it’s easy to see how it caught the ear of The Black Keys’ Dan Auerbach, who produced its 2007 self-titled debut. Like the Keys, Radio Moscow updates an old-school style with pure passion and a refreshing lack of irony. – Christopher Bahn / The ONION (A.V. Club – Minneapolis)
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If the opening squall of Parker Griggs’ paint-stripper lead guitar on opening cut "I Just Don’t Know" doesn’t tell you something significant about the shit that passes for high-rotation-programmed-within-a-centimetre-of-its-sad-existence commercial radio these days, go to the back of the class. You were off playing ABBA records in the home economics kitchen when the teacher broke out the sacrament and gave the rest of the class the lesson in Hendrix 101. Major Fail.
To be accurate, Griggs doesn’t slavishly replicate Jimi’s distinctive overdriven tone and wah-wah wonderment across these 10 bluesy tunes, but he’s batting in the same ballpark and hitting home run after home run for the six string team regardless (…) One of the best trips I’ve taken in 1969, sorry, 2009. – The Barman / I-94 Bar
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"Broke Down" Rolling Stone’s Smoking Section pick
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Call it blues rock, call it psychedelic, call it hard-grooved stoner rock. Call it whatever the hell you want, as long as you just call it ROCK. – Pajiba
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With the ability to create intense, raw and gritty guitar riffs that make up a changing landscape of sludgy blues and full-fledged blues rock, power trio Radio Moscow arrive at each gig ready to blast sound waves hinting of past rock and roll glories into the ears of nearby listeners. – Onmilwaukee.com interview with Parker Griggs
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This isn’t Wolfmother-style emulation of a classic rock sound – this is the real deal. – Esdmusic
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Radio Moscow is growing up, but they don’t abandon their blues-psychedelic sound that is sure to fuel bong circles in smoky dorm rooms all over college campuses. – Woody /Hear Ya
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This second album is right there in that spot that bands like Groundhogs or Cream took you to, those acid drenched stoner blues of Hendrix, Ten Years After or early Fleetwood Mac. No musical revolution going down here then, no, just righteous real deal old school psychedelic blue rock – sometimes, when things are done this well then that’s more than enough, revolutions aren’t always needed. – Organ magazine
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Brought to you by Russia’s international radio broadcasting service – by way of Iowa, admittedly – Radio Moscow does for Blue Cheer what the Black Keys do for 21st century blues: stomps it. Sophomore disc Brain Cycles pulses with Parker Griggs’ best Hendrix, while bassist Zach Anderson’s monolithic fuzz mashes beats with drummer Cory Berry. – Raoul Hernandez / Austin Chronicle
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Brain Cycles is more than a continuation of Radio Moscow; it’s an overall improvement. Recommended. – John Pegoraro / StonerRock.com
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Brain Cycles could pass for some long-lost heavy blues workout from the late ’60s or early ’70s, with layers of gargantuan Marshall-powered guitar tones flowing through wah-wahs and fuzz units as the rhythm section jams with indefatigable purpose over acres of six-string wailing. If Cream and Blue Cheer had a baby, it would sound an awful lot like Radio Moscow, and if historical accuracy were the sole criteria, Brain Cycles would be some sort of masterpiece. – Mark Deming / All Music Guide
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There’s plenty here for fans of both blues and psych, although it’s definitely more of a blues-rock record than a psychedelic record. – Greg Argo / Adequacy
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I’m about 100% positive that I’m not the only sucker out there for some vintage psychedelia. Radio Moscow is the type of down-home bred band we all imagine. You know, the no name town (Story City, Iowa), the direct influences (Peter Green, Nuggets compilations, really any psychedelic guitar god), and the boy prodigy (insert Parker Griggs). But make no mistake, these boys are the real deal. – John Bohannon / PopMatters
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Transmitting infectious old skool rock vibes, Radio Moscow completely owns rock’n’roll in 2009. – Lemur blog
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Brain Cycles is packed to the brim with juicy, Hendrix-style electric guitar riffs backed by vocalist Parker Griggs’ powerful vocals in a musical concoction that recalls a louder, more rebellious time in rock and roll history. – The 412 by ShowClix
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Let’s raise our glasses once again to Alive Records for bringing another of this year’s best to the listeners. And most definitely hats off to the Radio Moscow boys for tapping into something that was in or added to the water back in the days when rock and roll was all about throwing on the cans, lighting some incense, and freeing ones mind. – Andrew Bryan / Disc Exchange
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Radio Moscow is a heavy-jam powerhouse, with many of the tracks clocking in at 4- and 5-minutes, and the studio-effect heavy “No Good Woman” stretching to over eight, including a (flashback alert!) minute-thirty drum solo. – Hyperbolium
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Electric Decadence : interview with Parker Griggs for The Waster. – The Waster
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Amidst the Pitchfork-friendly indie bands that crowd the lineup of nearly every SXSW showcase, Iowa’s Radio Moscow were a refreshingly unpretentious change of pace: a power trio that cranked out Hendrix/Cream-inspired blues-rock jams. – Metromix NYC
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Like Peter Green fronting the Flower Travellin’ Band, Radio Moscow’s second album Brain Cycles is as full of blues, soul and psych experimentation as Richie Havens’ set at Woodstock. – RCLD
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This is a new Moscow wind, fresh-air. This album crushes you a little bit harder than the previous self-titled. What you did not get from the previous one, completes you here. – Heavy Comet
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Sure, blues-rock bands ripping off Zeppelin are a dime-a-dozen, but the most fascinating thing about Brain Cycles is that frontman Parker Griggs single-handedly performs all guitar, drums, and vocals on the album. Griggs’ vocals are soulful and tastefully gritty, similar to contemporary blues outfit Black Keys. – Blare
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Consequence Of Sound interview with Parker Griggs
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Think Sabbath riffs, a sturdy rhythm section and the holy power of the wah-wah pedal. – PunkRock Theory
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If you’ve ever had a Jimi Hendrix poster on your wall, or simply have an affection for swaggering blues with that vintage wah-wah guitar sound, you need to hear this album. – Covert Curiosity
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Rock Times review (France) | French interview with Parker Griggs | Musica Rock review (Spain) | Album Rock review (France) | Blouson Noir review (France) | Planet Gong review (France) | Infos Jeunes (France) | Hell Yeah (Spain) |
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The band exists out of time. And like those two bands, Radio Moscow also manages to take a well worn style and make it its own. An astonishingly good debut. – StonerRock.com
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They may be out of time, but they’re doing their best to make us all remember real rock and roll. – Headexploder
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Do yourself a favor. Put down that video game controller, and instead of pretending to play Sabbath and Deep Purple, turn up your stereo and bask in the power of mighty guitar work Griggs supplies on these tunes. – Contra Costa Times
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Each track on “Brain Cycles” features mellow Griggs mellow vocals, heavy-yet-bluesy riffs, jazzy drum fills and hazy psychedelics. – Metal Mayhem
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Singer/vocalist Parker Griggs displayed serious chops, pulling off the type of guitar work Jimi Hendrix and Eric Clapton (Cream) patented. His Orange amp produced the right sound for making blues-based, heavy jam music. – High Times Doobie Awards SXSW / Blistering
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These guys are guitar driven rock blues from a lowly road of somewhere I’m not sure where but who gives fuck, they sound great on each and every song. This music should be played on 11 at all times. – Music Filter
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This is the rebirth of Hendrix, sprinkled with Zeppelin feel, Morrison vocals, and if you can believe a little Crows soul. – The Killer Fleas
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Available for download : Hearya sessions
Parker Griggs is one of the best young guitarists out there today, if not the best. He’s a prodigy. As he matures and his songwriting chops get refined, there is no limit on what he and his band can do in the future. Next time they are in your town, go see them. – HearYa.com
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Crustier than a bad case of psoriasis and greaser than a chicken fried steak, the Ames, Iowa threesome Radio Moscow put the power back in power trio. – Modern Fix
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This is blues rock as it was meant to be played, not as it was watered down by the hairspray-conscious acts of the 80s. – Bob Lange/Rock and roll and meandering nonsense
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Awesome record-fun and slutty and cool, I’m in favor of it all the way. – Matt Cibula / Popmatters
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Be it in the extended solos, inventive basslines or mellow yet soulful vocal, this stuff doesn’t so much imitate the Brit power trio but recall it with its own updated spin. Make mine psych blues with a wah wah twist-Bluesheads will lap it up. Guitar psych fans too. – I-94 Bar
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Wah wah pedal Hendrix guitars greet you upon the needle drop. Radio Moscow is a throwback of retro garage blues fury. You gotta love wailing guitar solos too, or forget it. Most of RM’s music is 60s freakout jams. Whether it’s more on the noodlier Cream side of things or the caveman stomp of The Sonics, Radio Moscow plays a blistering update on classic acid 60s guitar rock. "Timebomb" has all the above, and slows things down to a blues guitar half-time that Robbie Krieger would dig. And when Parker Griggs (who plays all instruments but bass) starts cranking it out, he’s a guitar wizard. It’s a very authentic sound, nothing gives it away that Radio Moscow are from 2007 not 1967. – Culture Bunker
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Let’s thank the guitar gods for the likes of Parker Griggs. – Review of the San Francisco show from Free Radio SF
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There’s another story to Radio Moscow, and that’s the emergence of a new guitar hero — Parker Griggs. Man, if that riff rifling six-string could talk, it would surely say, "Look out rockers, there’s a new sheriff in town." – I Rock Cleveland
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Masterminded by 22-year old multi-talent Parker Griggs, it’s surprising that this record is a product of someone born in an era of neon bracelets and Duran Duran; instead, Griggs summons up the soul of Hendrix and licks of Cream-era Clapton. – Adam Simpkins / The Nerve
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SPIN Artist of the Day on Spin.com : marrying the bluesy psychedelic fervor of Cream with the big, precise fretwork of Jimi Hendrix, Radio Moscow relish in distortion and grittiness. Prevalent are themes of heartache, heartbreak, and drug intake, sometimes accompanied by instrumental forays into tumbleweeding country ("Lickskillet") and East Indian-influenced soundscapes ("Ordovician Fauna").
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Who said rock n’ roll was dead? – Coffee and Cassettes
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Hendrix’s body may be rotting six feet under, but his soul lives on through Radio Moscow front man and multi instrumentalist Parker Griggs. – By- Tor & The Snow Dog
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Radio Moscow infused trippy rock with heartfelt blues and created a sound of unadulterated instrumental taunts. – Music Snitch
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A nice blast from the past played today. Cool stuff. The Rock’n'roll Report
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A fine piece of retro rock that will warm the hearts of all stoned music freaks who think that lava lamps and blacklight posters is the coolest stuff ever invented. – Lowcut
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At the ripe age of 22, Griggs rips solos like there’s no tomorrow and some tunes even feature multiple solo work. The band is a trio but their sound is full and loud, not unlike another trio, the Jimi Hendrix Experience. – The Area Scene
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Mod as mod can be, and psychedelic too. Radio Moscow has the swing, man, they got the mojo. – Muzic
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In a time where a current guitarist can’t make a top 100 guitar solos of all time list, Griggs couldn’t have come along at a better time. – HearYa
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Radio Moscow on Fuel TV
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Dan Auerbach helps Ames, Iowa, psychedelic blues-rockers Radio Moscow tap into their love of Jimi Hendrix and the Allman Brothers on this debut effort, which also delves into country and East Indian sounds. – MTV news
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Review of the album art on the East Bay Express blog | Parker’s interview for Tinnitus (Germany)
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"Ordovician Fauna", a mentally disturbing vibe rings through your head after listening to this reminding you to not do drugs, or is it the other way around? "Fuse", again another instrumental powerhouse, concludes this psychedelic journey, suddenly giving me meaning to the statement "Blues Explosion". – Hotel 84
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‘Whatever Happened’ could easily have been a Led Zep B-side with Parker Griggs giving a scorching performance on the guitar and vocals. ‘Deep Blue Sea’ is more straight Blues, with funky back porch drums and acoustic slide guitar. – Jamie Hailstone / Blues Matters (UK)
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HearYa’s answer to Pitchfork’s review of Radio Moscow
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Tampa show review on Ninebullets.net
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The album is a heady mix of powerhouse instrumentals, rootsy acoustic blues numbers and lo-fi garage romps, sometimes marked by wah-wah or slide guitar or even sitar. – Kinda Blues
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Radio Moscow’s debut cd is electric guitar fueled blues rock that can find a groove and ride it so hard it’ll scar your speakers. – Nine Bullets
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They are a huge, loud guitar orgy just waiting for you to give them an ear. And Tampa did. In all the shows I’ve seen at New World I have never seen a band play an encore and Radio Moscow was not planning on playing one either but the crowd demanded it. I ain’t exaggerating either. – Sticks of Fire live review
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Ames, Iowa isn’t exactly known as a hotbed of psychedelic blues. And yet, from that very burg comes Radio Moscow, a trio who are quite deftly carrying the torch left by the likes of Cream, Jimi Hendrix and everybody in the late ’60s who viewed wah-wahs, fuzz boxes and crazily overdriven tube amps as essential components of rock guitar. – Douglas Jordan / StAugustine.com
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Scorching guitars straight out of Hendrix’s grab bag produced by the Black Keys’ Dan Auerbach, this is a must for fans of gnarly guitar shredding rooted in the blues. – Paul Saitowitz / PE Com
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Basically what this band sounds like to me is Black Keys style riffs and singing, Comets on Fire psych freakouts, and then plenty of homage to the old psych-blues bands of yesteryear: Cream, Hendrix, Yardbirds, etc. It’s an amazing record and is guaranteed to make you rock out. – A Tune A Day
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A concoction of psychedelic garage rock with complicated melodic, spinning riffs to please even the most dedicated rock ‘n roll maestro’s! – Velvet Grooves
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Radio Moscow is a syncretic concoction of Blue Cheer, Hendrix, Sabbath, Cream, and The Edgar Brougton Band but at the Kremlin core of the Russian Nesting Doll is a neoteric aberration that patiently waits to jugulate. – Sugarbuzzmagazine
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These blues-rock revisionists, hailing from Ames, Iowa got The Black Keys’ guitarist Dan Auerbach in to produce this monstrously good album, which takes its cues from the freeform instrumental workouts of Cream and Jimi Hendrix and the powerhouse riffage of Black Sabbath. – Boomkat (UK)
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There’s enough tempo and textural variety (including downbeat instrumental experiments and steel-string acoustic guitars mixed against howling electric slide) to keep things moving, but it’s the insistent rhythms and Griggs’ meaty, high-flying guitar solos that provide the transportation. – Hyperbolium
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Think of an album that’s one half Allman Brothers and one half Amboy Dukes and you might be in the ballpark. – Richard Oliver / Ear Candy
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A simmering mojo mixture of magic mushrooms, the soul of Jimi Hendrix, and hallucinatory daisy-chain vibrations filtered through a crawfish net full of bayou muck, alligator claws, and buzzing dragonfly wings. – Moser / Under The Volcano
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Radio Moscow’s self-titled album is a rocker’s dream album intermixed with some rarities that one wouldn’t generally find on a predominately rock album. – Celebrity Cafe
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Highlights include "Lucky Dutch," which contains a beefy riff that’s reminiscent of Ram Jam’s "Black Betty," "Lickskillet" begins as an acoustic blues ditty, before transforming into an Allman Brothers-esque dual guitar fest (complete with slide guitar), while both "Mistreating Queen" and "Whatever Happened" are muscular riff rock a la the Jeff Beck Group. – Greg Prato / All Music Guide
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